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Indicators of Well-being in Canada


Learning - Computer Access in Schools

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Computers have become important tools in today's society. Access to computers in schools exposes young people to information and communications technologies (ICT) that they can use to expand their knowledge. Computers also give young people skills to face future challenges in the use of rapidly changing technologies in the workplace.

The computer access in schools indicator measures the number of 15-year-old students who share a computer, based on the number of grade 10 (or equivalent) students in a school and the number of computers available to them for educational purposes. A lower number of students per computer, or lower student-to-computer ratio, indicates a better level of access.

Summary

  • National Picture — In 2009, students in schools across Canada shared computers at a ratio of 1.4 15-year-old students for each computer.
  • Regions — Student-to-computer ratios were lowest in Saskatchewan and highest in Quebec.
  • International Picture — Canada performed well internationally in terms of student access to computers in 2009. Canada was tied for second in the G8 with the USA.
  • Computer Use at School — In 2003, 40% of 15-year-old Canadian students reported frequent use of computers at school, 4 percentage points below the OECD average.

National Picture

In 2009, the average ratio of 15-year-old students per computer across Canada was 1.4.


This Chart contains data for Average student-to-computer ratio for 15-year-old students, 2009. Information is available in table below 2009 = 1.4 Average student-to-computer ratio for 15-year-old students, 2009

Source: Statistics Canada. Education indicators in Canada: Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program. Ottawa, Statistics Canada, 2012 (Cat. No. 81-582-X, see Table C5.1).


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Average student-to-computer ratio for 15-year-old students, 2009
2009
1.4

Regions

At 1.8 students per computer, Quebec had the highest number of students sharing a computer in 2009 followed by New Brunswick (1.5). Saskatchewan had the lowest ratio, at 1.0 student per computer. 

This Chart contains data for Average Student-to-computer ratio for 15-year-old students, by region, 2009. Information is available in table below BC = 1.4 AB = 1.2 SK = 1.0 MB = 1.2 ON = 1.3 QC = 1.8 NB = 1.5 NS = 1.2 PE = 1.3 NL = 1.3 CAN = 1.4 Average Student-to-computer ratio for 15-year-old students, by region, 2009

Source: Statistics Canada. Education indicators in Canada: Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program. Ottawa, Statistics Canada, 2012 (Cat. No. 81-582-X, see Table C5.1).


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Average Student-to-computer ratio for 15-year-old students, by region, 2009
CANNLPENSNBQCONMBSKABBC
1.41.31.31.21.51.81.31.21.01.21.4


International Picture

The international data drawn from the 2009 Program for International Student Assesment (PISA) are based on the number of 15-year-old students per computer. In 2009, Canada fared well, with an average of 1.4 students per computer, tied with the United States of America. The United Kingdom had the lowest number of students sharing a computer at 1.1, while Italy reported the highest average among G8 nations, at 2.3 students per computer.


This Chart contains data for Average student-to-computer ration for 15-year-old students, selected G8 countries, 2009. Information is available in table below Italy = 2.3 Russian Federation = 2.2 Japan = 2.2 Germany = 2.0 Canada = 1.4 United-States = 1.4 United Kingdom = 1.1 Average student-to-computer ration for 15-year-old students, selected G8 countries, 2009

Source: Statistics Canada. Education indicators in Canada: Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program. Ottawa, Statistics Canada, 2012 (Cat. No. 81-582-X, see Table C5.1).


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Average student-to-computer ration for 15-year-old students, selected G8 countries, 2009
United KingdomUnited-StatesCanadaGermanyJapanRussian FederationItaly
1.11.41.42.02.22.22.3

Computer Use at School

The additional measure, computer use at school, shows the percentage of 15-year-old students who reported using computers at school at least a few times each week in 2003. This section includes information for five of the G7 countries for which reliable data were available, as well as the OECD-24 average.

With 40% of students reporting frequent use of computers at school, Canada sits 4 percentage points below the OECD average, but is still in the middle range when compared with other G7 countries. Germany had the lowest proportion of students reporting frequent use of computers at school, at 23%; Italy had the highest proportion, at 51%.


This Chart contains data for Use of computers at school, selected OECD countries and the OECD-24 average, 2003. Information is available in table below Italy = 51 OECD-24 = 44 United States = 43 Canada = 40 Japan = 26 Germany = 23 (percent of students) Use of computers at school, selected OECD countries and the OECD-24 average, 2003

Note: 1) No data available for France. 2) Response rate for United Kingdom considered too low for comparability.

Source: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Education at a Glance 2006. Various ICT resources in secondary schools and percentage of various types of computers in school (2003). OECD Statistics. Available from: http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/4/9/37357264.xls, see Table D5.3 [cited, March, 2007].


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Use of computers at school, selected OECD countries and the OECD-24 average, 2003 (percent of students)
GermanyJapanCanadaUnited StatesOECD-24Italy
232640434451

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Date Modified:
2014-10-31