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Indicators of Well-being in Canada


Canadians in Context - Aboriginal Population

How many are we?

  1. Population Size and Growth

Where do we live?

  1. Geographic Distribution

What are our perceptions?

  1. Perceptions and Life Satisfaction



The following section provides information on National Aboriginal Populations, Regional Aboriginal Populations, Aboriginal Population Growth, and the Aboriginal Population Age.


National Aboriginal Populations

According to the 2011 National Household Survey, there was a total of 1,400,685 Aboriginal people in Canada, comprising 4.3% of the Canadian population. Of the three Aboriginal groups, First Nations (851,560) had the largest population, followed by Mtis (451,795), and Inuits (59,445).


This Chart contains data for Aboriginal population, Canada, 2011. Information is available in table below Multiple and other Aboriginal = 3% Inuit = 4% Mtis = 32% First Nations = 61% (percent) Aboriginal population, Canada, 2011

Source: Statistics Canada. Aboriginal Peoples in Canada: First Nations People, Metis and Inuit, National Household Survey, 2011, Catalogue no. 99-011-X2011001 [cited July 18, 2013].


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Aboriginal population, Canada, 2011 (percent)
First NationsMtisInuitMultiple and other Aboriginal
60.832.34.22.7

Regional Aboriginal Populations

Ontario and the four western provinces had the largest Aboriginal populations in 2011, ranging from 301,425 in Ontario to 157,740 in Saskatchewan. The provinces and territories with the highest proportion of Aboriginal populations were Nunavut (86.3%), the Northwest Territories (51.9%), Yukon (23.1%), Manitoba (16.7%) and Saskatchewan (15.6%). 


This Chart contains data for Individuals reporting Aboriginal identity, by region, 2011. Information is available in table below NU = 27.4 NT = 21.2 YT = 7.7 BC = 232.3 AB = 220.7 SK = 157.7 MB = 195.9 ON = 301.4 QC = 141.9 NB = 22.6 NS = 33.8 PE = 2.2 NL = 35.8 (thousands) Individuals reporting Aboriginal identity, by region, 2011

Source: Statistics Canada. Aboriginal Peoples in Canada: First Nations People, Metis and Inuit, National Household Survey, 2011, Catalogue no. 99-011-X2011001 [cited July 18, 2013].


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Individuals reporting Aboriginal identity, by region, 2011 (thousands)
NLPENSNBQCONMBSKABBCYTNTNU
35.82.233.822.6141.9301.4195.9157.7220.7232.37.721.227.4

Aboriginal Population Growth

Canada's Aboriginal population is growing faster than the general population, increasing by 20.1% from 2006 to 2011[1]. This is due to a higher fertility rate among Aboriginal women than among other Canadian women. Of the three Aboriginal groups (First Nations, Mtis, Inuit), First Nations had the largest population growth, with an increase of 22.9% between 2006 and 2011.

This Chart contains data for Aboriginal population growth, 2006-2011. Information is available in table below Non-Aboriginal = 5.2 Inuit = 18.1 Metis = 16.3 First Nations = 22.9 Aboriginal = 20.1 (percent) Aboriginal population growth, 2006-2011

Source: Statistics Canada. Aboriginal Peoples in Canada: First Nations People, Metis and Inuit, National Household Survey, 2011, Catalogue no. 99-011-X2011001 [cited July 18, 2013].


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Aboriginal population growth, 2006-2011 (percent)
AboriginalFirst NationsMetisInuitNon-Aboriginal
20.122.916.318.15.2

Aboriginal Population Age

The Aboriginal population is much younger than the overall Canadian population. In 2011, the median age of the total Aboriginal population was 27.7 years, which was 13 years lower than the median age of non-Aboriginals at 40.6 years.

This Chart contains data for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal population age, 2011. Information is available in table below 65+ years (Non-Aboriginal) = 14.2 65+ years (Aboriginal) = 5.9 55-64 years (Non-Aboriginal) = 13.4 55-64 years (Aboriginal) = 8.5 45-54 years (Non-Aboriginal) = 16.2 45-54 years (Aboriginal) = 13.2 35-44 years (Non-Aboriginal) = 13.6 35-44 years (Aboriginal) = 12.8 25-34 years (Non-Aboriginal) = 13.1 25-34 years (Aboriginal) = 13.4 15-24 years (Non-Aboriginal) = 12.9 15-24 years (Aboriginal) = 18.2 0-14 years (Non-Aboriginal) = 16.5 0-14 years (Aboriginal) = 28.0 (percent) Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal population age, 2011

Source: ESDC calculations based on Statistics Canada. 2011 National Household Survey, Catalogue no. 99-011-X2011028 [cited July 18, 2013].


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal population age, 2011 (percent)
0-14 years15-24 years25-34 years35-44 years45-54 years55-64 years65+ years
Aboriginal28.018.213.412.813.28.55.9
Non-Aboriginal16.512.913.113.616.213.414.2

Footnotes

  1. Some factors should be taken into account when comparing the 2006 Census and the 2011 National Household Survey data (e.g., differences in methodology in the 2011 NHS, wording of Aboriginal questions, etc.).

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Date Modified:
2014-07-24