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Indicators of Well-being in Canada


Family Life - Young Adults Living with their Parent(s)

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Leaving the parental home is often associated with completed education, new employment, marriage or union formation and childbearing. At the same time, longer stays in the parental homes can reflect the pursuit of education, the economic challenges of setting up a new household, or possibly a need for caregiving (to be cared for oneself, or to care for parents).

The young adults living with their parent(s) indicator measures the proportion of young adults aged 20 to 29 who live with their parent(s).

Summary

  • National Picture — In 2011, 42.3% of young adults aged 20 to 29 years lived with their parent(s). This is a significant increase from 30 years ago.
  • Age and Gender — In 2011, 63.3% of young men and 55.2% of young women aged 20 to 24 lived with their parent(s).
  • Boomerang Kids — Almost one quarter of young adults who live in their parental home had left the household at some point in the past.
  • Regions — In 2011, Ontario had the highest proportion (50.6%) of young adults who lived in their parental home.

National Picture

Young adults are delaying the transition from their parental home. Between 1981 and 2011, the proportion of young adults aged 20 to 29 who resided in their parental home rose 15.4 percentage points from 26.9% to 42.3%.


This Chart contains data for Young adults (aged 20 to 29) living with their parent(s), Canada, 1981, 2006 and 2011. Information is available in table below 2011 = 42.3 2006 = 42.5 1981 = 26.9 (percent) Young adults (aged 20 to 29) living with their parent(s), Canada, 1981, 2006 and 2011

Source: Statistics Canada, 2011 Census.Living arrangements of young adults aged 20 to 29.2011 Census in Brief. Ottawa: Statistics Canada, 2012 (Cat. No. 98-312-X2011003).


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Young adults (aged 20 to 29) living with their parent(s), Canada, 1981, 2006 and 2011 (percent)
198120062011
26.942.542.3

Age and Gender

Younger adults from 20 to 24 years old are more likely to have delayed the transition from their parental home than older adults from 25 to 29 years old. In 2011, over half of all young adults from 20 to 24 years old lived with their parents (63.3% of young men and 55.2% of young women). A significantly lower percentage of men and women lived in their parental home between the ages of 25 and 29 (29.6% of men and 20.9% of women).

Between 1981 and 2011, there was an increase in the percentage of both men and women aged 20 to 29 who were living at home. There was an increase of 12.3 percentage points for men aged 20 to 24, and 22.2 percentage points for women of the same age group. The percentage of men aged 25 to 29 almost doubled, while the percentage of women aged 25 to 29 more than doubled in the same time.   


This Chart contains data for Young adults (aged 20 to 29) living with their parent(s), by age and gender, 1981, 2006 and 2011. Information is available in table below Women 25-29 years (2011) = 20.9 Women 25-29 years (2006) = 21.3 Women 25-29 years (1981) = 8.3 Men 25-29 years (2011) = 29.6 Men 25-29 years (2006) = 30.9 Men 25-29 years (1981) = 15.0 Women 20-24 years (2011) = 55.2 Women 20-24 years (2006) = 55.3 Women 20-24 years (1981) = 33.0 Men 20-24 years (2011) = 63.3 Men 20-24 years (2006) = 65.2 Men 20-24 years (1981) = 51.0 (percent) Young adults (aged 20 to 29) living with their parent(s), by age and gender, 1981, 2006 and 2011

Source: Statistics Canada. 2011 Census. Living arrangements of young adults aged 20 to 29.2011 Census in Brief. Ottawa: Statistics Canada, 2012 (Cat. No. 98-312-X2011003).


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Young adults (aged 20 to 29) living with their parent(s), by age and gender, 1981, 2006 and 2011 (percent)
Men 20-24 yearsWomen 20-24 yearsMen 25-29 yearsWomen 25-29 years
198151.033.015.08.3
200665.255.330.921.3
201163.355.229.620.9

Boomerang Kids

A boomerang kid is an adult child who has left home at some point in the past to live on their own and has returned to live in the parental home. The reason for leaving the parental home has changed for younger age groups. Until the late 1980s, the number one reason for leaving the parental home was to get married. Since then, the most common reason for leaving home was to attend school.[1] This has contributed to the return of adult children to the parental home. It has also delayed the complete transition from the parental home to independence. In 2001, almost one quarter of adult children living with parent(s) were boomerang kids.


This Chart contains data for Young adults (aged 20 to 29) living with their parent(s), Canada, 2001. Information is available in table below Adult child returned home = 24% Adult child never left home = 76% (percent) Young adults (aged 20 to 29) living with their parent(s), Canada, 2001

Source: Turcotte, Martin. "Parents with adult children living at home." Canadian Social Trends. Ottawa, Statistics Canada, Spring 2006 (Cat. No. 11-008-XIE, no.80).


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Young adults (aged 20 to 29) living with their parent(s), Canada, 2001 (percent)
Adult child never left homeAdult child returned home
7624

Regions

The proportion of young adults living in their parental home varied among provinces in 2011. Ontario had the highest proportion (50.6%) of young adults living in their parental home, and Saskachewan had the lowest proportion (30.6%).


This Chart contains data for Young adults (aged 20 to 29) living with their parent(s), by region, 2011. Information is available in table below NU = 38.4 NT = 34.6 YT = 35.7 BC = 41.1 AB = 31.4 SK = 30.6 MB = 40.2 ON = 50.6 QC = 37.9 NB = 36.8 NS = 38.1 PE = 43.3 NL = 44.7 CAN = 42.3 (percent) Young adults (aged 20 to 29) living with their parent(s), by region, 2011

Source: Statistics Canada. 2011 Census - Data Products - Highlights Tables - Families and Households.Young adults in the parental home for the population aged 20 to 29 in private households, percentage distributions (2011), for both sexes, 20 to 29 years, for Canada, provinces and territories. Statistics Canada: Ottawa, 2012.


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Young adults (aged 20 to 29) living with their parent(s), by region, 2011 (percent)
CANNLPENSNBQCONMBSKABBCYTNTNU
42.344.743.338.136.837.950.640.230.631.441.135.734.638.4

Footnotes

  1. Statistics Canada.'When is junior moving out? Transition from the parental home to independence.' Canadian Social Trends. Ottawa, Statistics Canada, August 2006 (Cat. No. 11-008-XIE, no.82).

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Date Modified:
2014-04-25